Ask me anything   A kiss is a lovely trick designed by nature to stop speech when words become superfluous. -Ingrid Bergman
bpod-mrc:

30 May 2014
Simplifying Sight
A picture’s worth a 1000 words but for the visual system, an image represents over 100 million puzzles to solve. This is the number of light-sensitive cells – called rods and cones (comb shapes in this drawing of the retinal cell layers) – that each sends a signal from the retina when we open our eyes. To avoid being overwhelmed, the visual system needs to extract the most important aspects of the scene from this deluge. Horizontal cells (in yellow), whose tentacles connect to multiple rods and cones, play this important role. They compare activity from groups of cells and then block all but the strongest signals from reaching the brain for processing. And they can even deal simultaneously with the different demands of spatial and temporal information. This ability that’s long-puzzled scientists now appears to involve an enzyme (shown by small green patches) that adapts nerve pathways to judge temporal cues.
Written by Jan Piotrowski
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Adapted from an image created by Rozan Vroman, Jan Klooster provided the immunocytochemical picture The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN-KNAW) Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0) Original article published in PLOS Biology, May 2014
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bpod-mrc:

30 May 2014

Simplifying Sight

A picture’s worth a 1000 words but for the visual system, an image represents over 100 million puzzles to solve. This is the number of light-sensitive cells – called rods and cones (comb shapes in this drawing of the retinal cell layers) – that each sends a signal from the retina when we open our eyes. To avoid being overwhelmed, the visual system needs to extract the most important aspects of the scene from this deluge. Horizontal cells (in yellow), whose tentacles connect to multiple rods and cones, play this important role. They compare activity from groups of cells and then block all but the strongest signals from reaching the brain for processing. And they can even deal simultaneously with the different demands of spatial and temporal information. This ability that’s long-puzzled scientists now appears to involve an enzyme (shown by small green patches) that adapts nerve pathways to judge temporal cues.

Written by Jan Piotrowski

Adapted from an image created by Rozan Vroman, Jan Klooster provided the immunocytochemical picture
The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience (NIN-KNAW)
Originally published under a Creative Commons Licence (BY 4.0)
Original article published in PLOS Biology, May 2014

You can also follow BPoD on Twitter and Facebook

— 2 months ago with 33 notes
"Fall in love with someone who’s comfortable with your silence. Find someone who doesn’t need your words to know it’s time to kiss you."
Clairabelle Ann (via brutalgeneration)

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winter-w4ves:

exclusive-femme:

f-akeflowers:

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asyourlife:

 

i really love this photo because she has stretch marks and its the only post ive seen of a half naked girl with stretch marks. its real and i like it and she has a nice butt which makes me feel better about my stretch marks

i reablog this so much, but i can’t help it, it’s honestly my favorite picture in this website

Love


x

winter-w4ves:

exclusive-femme:

f-akeflowers:

r-efracted:

asyourlife:

 

i really love this photo because she has stretch marks and its the only post ive seen of a half naked girl with stretch marks. its real and i like it and she has a nice butt which makes me feel better about my stretch marks

i reablog this so much, but i can’t help it, it’s honestly my favorite picture in this website

Love

x

(Source: lunaoki, via spuntqueen)

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taggedwhat:

when you text somebody for the first time and their texting style is completely different from yours 

image

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